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The Queen will pause to gaze on Prince Philip’s coffin as it’s lowered into final resting place at funeral

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The Queen will pause to gaze on Prince Philip's coffin as it is lowered into the Duke of Edinburgh's final resting place at his funeral on Saturday.

Prince Philip, 99, sadly passed away last Friday, 9 April, with his funeral taking place at St George's Chapel eight days after his death.

More details are being revealed about the ceremony, which will see the Duke's coffin arrive in a Land Rover that he had a hand in designing, including how his widow will say her last goodbye to him.

After sitting alone during the ceremony, the Queen will stand in front of her husband's coffin and watch it be lowered into the royal vault in a poignant moment which will be broadcast around the world.

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Before the coffin is lowered, a Royal Marine will play the Action Stations – which is sounded on naval warships to signal all hands must go to battle stations – following a tradition in naval funerals that will honour Philip's service during World War II.

A Buckingham Palace spokesperson said: "While clearly the plans have been modified to take into account public health guidelines, the ceremonial aspects of the day and the funeral service itself are still very much in line with the Duke's wishes."


Prince Philip's funeral has been scaled back due to coronavirus restrictions, meaning only 30 people are allowed to attend instead of the 800-1000 that usually attend royal ceremonies.

It has been revealed the Duke of Edinburgh will continue to rest inside a Private Chapel before the funeral takes place on Saturday, where he will be draped in his personal standard equipped with his naval cap and a wreath of family flowers on top.

He will then be moved to the entrance of the Inner Hall of Windsor Castle, where his coffin will be loaded into the Jaguar Land Rover he designed himself.

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At 2pm, the Lord Chamberlain, the Constable and Governor of Windsor Castle will make their way into the Inner Hall, where the Dean of Windsor will say prayers before they all go to St George's Chapel to officiate.

Military lines, consisting of those who recognise Philip's time in the Royal Navy, will then be formed up Frogmore Drive and Mausoleum Road.

Prince Philip 1921-2021

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Prince Philip will then move through castle grounds with members of the Royal family set to follow the procession on foot.

The Queen will arrive in her Bentley, at the rear of the procession, where it will pause briefly before making it's way to Galilee Porch, where Her Majesty, 94, will be received by the Dean of Windsor.

A national minute's silence will take place at 3pm before the coffin is taken into St George's Chapel.

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