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Celtic's Leigh Griffiths' girlfriend issues warning about skin cancer

Girlfriend of Celtic footballer Leigh Griffiths shares photos of her skin cancer scare after having moles removed and warns people not to ‘fry’ themselves on holiday or use sunbeds

  • Caitlyn Melville, 28, of Bothwell, South Lanarkshire, shared post on Instagram
  • Opened up about her skin cancer ordeal and shared shocking photos of wounds
  • Urged her followers to be cautious in the sun and not use sunbeds this summer

The girlfriend of Celtic footballer Leigh Griffiths has shared a stark warning about skin cancer amid the ‘buzz’ around sunbeds and sunny holidays.

Caitlynn Melville, 28, of Bothwell, South Lanarkshire, shared an emotional post on Instagram detailing her frightening personal experience in light of it being skin cancer awareness month.

Sharing two photos from past operations to have cancerous moles removed, Caitlynn – who has been dating Griffiths for four years – urged her 8,460 followers to be cautious this summer.

She wrote: ‘Don’t normally do posts like this since my operations but it’s weird how I’ve felt I wanted to this year. 

Caitlynn Melville, girlfriend of Celtic footballer Leigh Griffiths (pictured together) has shared a stark warning about skin cancer amid the ‘buzz’ around sunbeds and sunny holidays


Sharing two photos from operations to have cancerous moles removed, Caitlynn – who has been dating Griffiths for four years – urged her 8,460 followers to be cautious this summer


Caitlynn shared an emotional post on Instagram detailing her frightening personal experience of skin cancer in light of it being skin cancer awareness month

‘I don’t know if it’s because sunbeds and sunny holidays have been off limits for so long that there now is such a buzz about them that there wasn’t before?

‘Keep seeing and hearing so many people saying how they’ve “hammered the sunbeds” and “can’t wait to get away to fry myself” so maybe that’s why this year is the year. 

‘Anyway, I’m absolutely not here to preach to people not to use sunbeds or go on holiday and get a tan, but just please be careful. Everyone always thinks “it won’t happen to me” just like I did and then it WAS me.

‘If you do anything this month please check any moles/freckles incase they have changed or incase new ones have appeared. If you are worried SEE your GP. 

‘All they can say is no it’s nothing to worry about or investigate quickly – it’s a win win. Stay safe.’


Caitlynn, who regularly shares snaps of herself on exotic holidays with father-of-five Griffiths – didn’t reveal when she had the moles removed

Caitlynn, who regularly shares snaps of herself on exotic holidays with father-of-five Griffiths – didn’t reveal when she had the moles removed.

Her post received hundreds of likes and many commented praising Caitlynn for speaking out and sharing her story.

One wrote: ‘As a nurse I love that you have used your social media platform to share this! You will have made a huge difference to lots of young peoples lives by sharing this.’ 

Another revealed: ‘My best friend was diagnosed with stage 4 skin cancer. Two years ago. Never used a sun bed, not a sun worshipper who lay in it hours. She has to be checked regularly. Thank you for being brave & sharing on your platform.’

And one commented: ‘Thank you for sharing, cant have been easy for you to do, raising awareness is crucial and using your platform to do this shows what an amazing person you are.’  

Caitlynn’s post received hundreds of likes and many commented praising her for speaking out and sharing her story

MELANOMA IS THE MOST DANGEROUS FORM OF SKIN CANCER

Melanoma is the most dangerous form of skin cancer. It happens after the DNA in skin cells is damaged (typically due to harmful UV rays) and then not repaired so it triggers mutations that can form malignant tumors. 

Around 15,900 new cases occur every year in the UK, with 2,285 Britons dying from the disease in 2016, according to Cancer Research UK statistics. 

Causes

  • Sun exposure: UV and UVB rays from the sun and tanning beds are harmful to the skin
  • Moles: The more moles you have, the greater the risk for getting melanoma 
  • Skin type: Fairer skin has a higher risk for getting melanoma
  • Hair color: Red heads are more at risk than others
  • Personal history: If you’ve had melanoma once, then you are more likely to get it again
  • Family history: If previous relatives have been diagnosed, then that increases your risk

Treatment 

  • Removal of the melanoma:

This can be done by removing the entire section of the tumor or by the surgeon removing the skin layer by layer. When a surgeon removes it layer by layer, this helps them figure out exactly where the cancer stops so they don’t have to remove more skin than is necessary. 

  • Skin grafting: 

The patient can decide to use a skin graft if the surgery has left behind discoloration or an indent. 

  • Immunotherapy, radiation treatment or chemotherapy: 

This is needed if the cancer reaches stage III or IV. That means that the cancerous cells have spread to the lymph nodes or other organs in the body. 

Prevention

  • Use sunscreen and do not burn
  • Avoid tanning outside and in beds 
  • Apply sunscreen 30 minutes before going outside
  • Keep newborns out of the sun
  • Examine your skin every month
  • See your physician every year for a skin exam 

 Source: Skin Cancer Foundation and American Cancer Society

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