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Marquess of Bath and Strictly star wife buy Churchill's London home

Marquess of Bath and his Strictly star wife Emma Weymouth buy London townhouse that was Churchill’s last home from divorcee with Nazi relative for £18.5m

  • The Marquess of Bath and his wife purchased Kensington home for £18.5m
  • Grade II-listed home was where Winston Churchill took his last breath in 1965
  • It was also owned by a divorcee who married into a family with a Nazi relative

The Marquess of Bath and his wife, Strictly star Emma Weymouth, have purchased a property in Kensington London once lived in by Winston Churchill for £18.5 million.

The Grade II-listed home was bought from a multi-millionaire divorcee whose former husband’s Nazi-supporting grandfather was convicted at the Nuremberg trials.

Churchill lived there on-and-off from 1945 until his death – inside his bedroom – in 1965 at the age of 90 after suffering a stroke. 

The grand home was last put on the market in 2016 for £28 million after undergoing extensive renovations. 

It features seven bedrooms, four bathrooms and a drawing room with double-height ceilings.

The Marquess of Bath, Ceawlin Thynn, and his wife Emma Weymouth, pictured at the 10th Annual Filmmakers Dinner in France 2019. The couple purchased a property in Kensington London once lived in by Winston Churchill for £18.5 million

The grand home was last put on the market in 2016 for £28 million after undergoing extensive renovations

Up until Ceawlin Thynn and Emma Weymouth’s acquisition of the property, it was owned by Donatella Flick, who married the grandson of Nazi sympathiser Friedrich Flick.

Flick, a leading backer of the Nazis, was one of the Circle of Friends, a group of industrialists set up to create links between businesses and the Third Reich. He was sentenced to seven years in jail. 

Donatella bought the house near Hyde Park for £2.5 million in 1996. She has defended Friedrich, claiming his imprisonment for crimes against humanity was a miscarriage of justice.

She turned the bedroom where Churchill died into a sitting room dominated by a black-and-white colour scheme. 

Churchill lived there on-and-off from 1945 until his death – inside his bedroom – in 1965 at the age of 90 after suffering a stroke

‘Very simple, very strict, a little bit severe,’ she said. ‘That’s the way I am.’

In the spot where Churchill’s bed stood, she placed a coffee table laden with glossy books and tall white candles. 

Monogrammed cushions adorned black sofas, while on the staircase there was a bust of Wilhelm Furtwangler, the German conductor who fought off accusations that he was a Nazi sympathiser.

Land Registry documents confirm that the house was bought by Longleat Estate Holdings Ltd.

 Monogrammed cushions adorned black sofas, while on the staircase there was a bust of Wilhelm Furtwangler, the German conductor who fought off accusations that he was a Nazi sympathiser

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