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Nearly one month’s rain to batter Britain in just two hours as warning issued

Nearly one month's rainfall will lash across the UK tomorrow and cause a huge risk of more flooding , Met Office has warned .

Some 40mm of rain is expected to batter large swathes of the Midlands, East of England and the Home Counties in just two hours.

It'll be its heaviest during tomorrow afternoon and will linger into rush hour.

Met Office has issued a yellow weather warning, which highlights "a danger to life".

A forecaster for the Met Office said: "A few spots could see as much as 25 mm in an hour, and perhaps 40 mm in two or three hours.

"Although many places will miss them, heavy showers and thunderstorms may affect parts of the area through Wednesday afternoon, before slowly dying out during the evening."

Cambridge and Birmingham, two of the largest cities issued with the warning, typically see 51mm and 59mm of rainfall in August respectively.

And temperatures will also plunge tomorrow – to around 14C in central areas. The average for this time of year is 16C.

"Heavy showers and thunderstorms may cause some flooding and transport disruption," the weather warning reads.

  • Spray and sudden flooding could lead to difficult driving conditions and possible road closures
  • Where flooding or lightning strikes occur, there is a chance of delays and some cancellations to train and bus services
  • There is a slight chance that power cuts could occur and other services to some homes and businesses could be lost
  • There is a small chance that homes and businesses could be flooded quickly, with damage to some buildings from floodwater, lightning strikes or hail


A tornado warning was issued for parts of the UK last night.

People quickly shared dramatic photos of grey clouds online from different parts of the country including Sheffield, Ramsgate in Kent and Selsey in West Sussex.

One woman even claims she saw several tornadoes over the sea at Whitehaven, Cumbria.

"An upper trough will continue to move ESE this afternoon across the area," the UK's Tornado and Storm Research Organisation said yesterday.



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